14 Apr, 2024
1 min read

Orange-Osceola state attorney launches new initiative to combat violent crimes

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. – When State Attorney Andrew Bain was first appointed to the Ninth Judicial Circuit, he promised to restore order. Now, six months into office, he’s addressing crime in our communities with a new unit to target violent offenders.

News 6 spoke with the top prosecutor in Orange and Osceola counties Tuesday about the effort. Bain says the most serious cases, except for homicides, will be assigned to prosecutors in the new Violent Crimes Unit.

“To provide stability and safety you have to have not only great investigations by law enforcement, as well as citizens who are willing to step up and say no to these types of violent crimes, you also need us as an office to be ready to deal with those kinds of cases when they come in,” Bain said.

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The Violent Crimes Unit will handle cases including attempted murders, kidnappings, carjackings, home invasions, and armed robberies.

According to the most recent data released by the FBI, Florida’s rate of violent crimes was below the national average in 2022. The Orlando Police department had 2,597 offenses, the largest number of reported violent crimes in Orange County.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office shared some perspective when News 6 asked for information regarding the number of cases they handled last year.

A spokesperson said overall crime in Orange County is down 24% in the last five years. In 2023, they had 63 homicides, 50 carjackings, 19 home invasions, and 215 armed robberies against a person.

State Attorney Bain addressed a problem with gang violence when he spoke with our News 6 crew Tuesday.

“The gang violence in this community is really perpetrated by young people, and very young adults,” Bain said. “We have

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2 mins read

Legal Aid Sues Mayor Adams Over Inaction on Rental Voucher Reforms

The proposed class action suit was filed in New York State Supreme Court on behalf of four New Yorkers who say they should be eligible for CityFHEPS, but are closed out because the Adams administration has failed to implement laws expanding the program.

Emma Whitford

Marie Vincent, center, a cancer survivor living in a Harlem shelter with her grandson, is one of the plaintiffs in the Legal Aid suit.

The Legal Aid Society announced Wednesday that it is suing Mayor Eric Adams’ administration over its failure to implement several laws passed by the City Council to expand eligibility for the city’s housing voucher program.

The lawsuit is the latest in an ongoing dispute between the mayor and the Council over reforms to the City Family Homelessness and Eviction Prevention Supplement (CityFHEPS) program, which allows tenants to pay up to 30 percent of their income on rent while the city covers the rest, up to a fixed maximum.

Legal Aid’s proposed class action suit was filed in New York State Supreme Court on behalf of four New Yorkers who say they should be eligible for CityFHEPS, but are closed out because the Adams administration has failed to implement laws expanding the program.

Speaking outside City Hall Wednesday morning, Judith Goldiner of the Legal Aid Society said the lawsuit is simple, with the goal of compelling City Hall to enforce the legislation. “These are laws, they are not discretionary. The mayor has to obey them, like the rest of us have to obey laws that are passed,” she said.

The plaintiffs include Marie Vincent, a cancer survivor living in a Harlem shelter with her grandson who would qualify for a rental voucher under the Council’s Local Law 100, which raises the income ceiling for CityFHEPS applicants.

“I work nights doing housekeeping at

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